Understanding Child Custody for Unmarried Parents

Child custody concerns are always complicated, but they can be even more so for unmarried parents. If you are facing a child custody issue outside of the context of divorce, the best course of action is working closely with an experienced Missouri family law attorney from the outset.

Child Custody

Child custody in the State of Missouri is divided into both legal custody and physical custody, and both can be either sole or joint. Legal custody has to do with who will be making major life decisions on behalf of your shared children moving forward, including:

  • Decisions about your children’s daycare and schooling
  • Decisions about your children’s extracurricular activities
  • Decisions about your children’s healthcare needs
  • Decisions about your children’s religious upbringing

On the other hand, physical custody determines how your shared children will share their time between the two of you. If your child custody concerns are not related to divorce, the path forward can be even more challenging.

Reach out to an Experienced Missouri Family Law Attorney Today

The dedicated family law attorneys at Aramjoo Law Firm – proudly serving the Kansas City area – are on your side and are well prepared to help you obtain custody terms that work for you and your children. To learn more, please don’t wait to contact or call us at ​​816-720-7750 today.

Child Custody FAQ

Do I need an attorney?

The consequences of your child custody case are so critical that you are well-advised to consult with an experienced family law attorney early on in the process.

How do the courts determine family law issues?

When it comes to decisions about children, the court is guided by the best interests of those children (from the court’s perspective).

Will my child’s preferences be taken into consideration?

While a child must be 18 to make his or her own decisions about which parent he or she lives with (if either), the court will consider a child’s preferences in making its custody decisions. It is not often wise to involve the child in litigation though.

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